Five reasons I like Webinars

  1. Fast and focused way to learn

Webinars are a fast paced medium of learning and have been with us for several years now. Where time is a valuable commodity they offer a niche well-timed learning experience.

  1. Recorded electronic source I can watch on my phone

From a technology standpoint as technology has progressed we can now even watch a webinar on the screen of our cell phones while sitting on a bus if we so desired with a 4G internet connection. Using YouTube we can even hold a repository of past webinars to be replayed when desired. I can also contact the presenter in most cases with follow up questions and go further into a subject.

  1. I can pick the topics to learn

If there is something you wish to learn about, be it industry specific or not, you can find a webinar covering just about any topic.

  1. I can do it at night

Convenience is a word that sums up the experience saving participants from traveling to a learning environment. Audiences are not limited by numbers or distance and people can attend a webinar event from just about anywhere in the World, at any time, without them or the host having to leave their office or even home.

  1. When I want to go further on the topic I can email or call the presenter

Webinars offer two-way interaction between the audience and presenters allowing for valuable structured question and answer sessions following presentations.

Ruskin® hosts a webinar series on the second Wednesday of every month offering learning on relevant HVAC topics. The next webinar on August 9th, 2017 will give attendees insight into the latest critical environment damper series, which offers products suited for corrosive prone, or sanitary based applications. The webinar will cover the product names and damper type, features and options that make them durable, and suitable applications. Register here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/1839671351862350338

The Benefits of Sunshades

As you can see by the pictures above, when a designer or architect uses Sunshades (or Brise-soleil as they say in Europe) as part of a building’s design it can dramatically improve the exterior aesthetics of that building.

In addition to making the building look great, designers know how to also reduce energy usage of HVAC cooling units by applying best practices for passive sunlight control to help reduce glare and solar heat gain through glazing. This all reduces cooling energy load, and saves on building energy usage, a facility manager’s dream! With additional natural lighting benefits, this ultimately contributes to our main objective today, creating energy efficient buildings.

Taking the energy savings into consideration sunshades are a great way to accumulate LEED (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) points for a project through the USGBC (United States Green Building Council). Sunshades tick the boxes for optimizing energy performance, using recycled content, regional content, daylight, and views. Sunshades can also be made to conform with ASHRAE 189.1, section 8.4.1/8.5.1 where shading with louvers and sunshades is detailed.

There are many varieties of sunshades which can be mounted both horizontally and vertically, as well as paint finishes to compliment any building’s appearance.  The use of factory supplied assembled, painted or in-house anodized sections assure that the submitted design is adhered to and meets local code requirements.

To learn a more about sunshades click here.

Growth of Data Centers in North America

As US businesses expand, strategic location and storage must be considered over storage and interaction with their data. Today data centers are allowing businesses to relocate their data rather than having resource consuming servers on site. Gone are the days where companies had their systems in an over-sized closet on site with the air-conditioning running on maximum.

In turning to these cloud solutions the business will enjoy better data bandwidth, avoid regulation and compliance issues and save huge amounts of money on maintenance, running costs and even space. Data center running costs include the power consumption and maintenance of HVAC equipment. It is important to manage and keep outside air flowing efficiently and safely in and out of a data center environment to reduce energy loads. Hyper scaled cloud server facilities have made a complex science out of increasing data center efficiencies to bring down HVAC energy usage down as much as possible.

Next to the actual server systems used, cooling and air movement systems consume the most energy within the data center. Data centers are estimated at consuming at least as much as 1.8% of the USA’s electricity usage calculated at over 70 billion kilowatt-hours. Demands on these systems have increased substantially in recent years as server densities continue to rise.

Ruskin® has been out front and anticipating the trends to data center cooling and providing equipment to help solve customer challenges. Equipment that takes into consideration more economical cooling solutions as well as protection against the elements for data centers. In an independent study, the use of Airside Economizers reduced the energy use by as much as 13%!

In order to protect vital data center generators from overheating and causing a potential shut down, compromising critical information, a Ruskin CD50, CD60, and TED50 have all been used, which open quickly and allow for proper exhaust functionality.

In critical environments, the thermal-efficient TED50CE eliminates thermal transfer and the potential for condensation. The damper also meets the IECC, features the same non-corrosive bearings and shake-proof linkage as the CD50CE and includes twin seals to ensure no thermal path. Both of these dampers are low leakage, low maintenance, AMCA licensed to Class 1A and offer quieter performance to the data center facility manager.

Ruskin louvers and FEMA rated grilles, the HZ850, the EME720, and the XP500S also will protect your data center, as well as allow air flow in and out of the facility in areas that are prone to extreme weather conditions meeting AMCA 540 and AMCA 550 requirements.